Michigan Farms & Farm Families: Celebrating 55 Farms and Farm Families; Farm Markets, Ag-Tourism and Barn Preservation

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Michigan Farms & Farm Families: Celebrating 55 Farms and Farm Families; Farm Markets, Ag-Tourism and Barn Preservation by ERVIN BRENDA, 9780967480886
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  • ISBN: 9780967480886 | 0967480884
  • Cover: Paperback
  • Copyright: 5/1/2008
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""Ervin’s important undertaking inspired farmers statewide to see their barns in a new light and brought attention to an often overlooked category of Michigan’s architecture."" ~Michigan History Magazine "When I was a young girl growing up within the farm community near Rankin, in Genesee County, I heard the working sounds of tractors plowing large fields and watched the harvests of soybeans, wheat, hay, and oats. My ancestors were Michigan pioneers and farmers near Ludington and Grand Blanc. My love for all things farming came from them and continues to this day. Respect for the land and a deep respect for the profession of farming is the hallmark of this book. Since I began to canvass the state nearly two decades ago I’ve had the good fortune to visit the farms and talk to many generational farmers and families. Before Michigan became a state in 1837, pioneers came from all over the world to farm this fertile land then known as, The Land of Many Waters. Clearing giant trees of pine, oak, ash and maple, they plowed with ox or a team of horses, for the purpose of raising crops. Wheat, oats, corn and barley, were some of the first crops a new homesteader raised. Barns were built out of logs from the trees, to shelter bushels of precious grains and valuable animals. Just think what it must have been like in the 1800’s to travel by water and wagon through wilderness and swamps to the new territory called Michigan! These courageous pioneers, and those that came after them throughout the 19th and 20th centuries, were happy to find a place to call home."
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